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Marching boots
marschstiefel

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Marchstiefel Officer boots

At the beginning of the war, the black marching boots (Marschstiefel) measured 35-39cm from heel to top. However, on 9 november 1939 they were ordered shortened to 32-34cm as an economy measure. In mid-1940, these began to be replaced by ankle-length laced boots (Schnurschuh), worn in conjunction with either short anklets in field-grey or khaki, or captured British canvas anklets in a buff colour. (The anklets were given the rather sardonic nickname of "retreat puttees" or "Timoshenko socks", after a Russian general.) The short boot was initially issued to second-line troops; the front-line soldier retained the high boot. From 1943, however, the ankle boot was issued whenever the high boot needed replacing. By late in the war the latter was generally seen only on officers and rear-echelon troops. Photos show that the anklets/puttees were rarely worn in the front lines; most soldiers either wore the trousers loose over the boots, or tucked into socks.

 

Mountain boots
bergschuhe

Bergschuhe (Mountain boots) were issued only to Mountain Troops and were to be worn with the Berghosen. They were designed for employment in difficult mountainous terrain, and could also be used as ski-boots.

The boots were made of strong leather of a natural fawn, brown, or black color and usually lined with fine leather. The height in the front was 14-16 cm, and at the rear 13-15 cm. A 1.5 cm wide grey cloth or felt band was sewn to the upper edge. The leather bootlace measured one meter long and 3 mm in diameter, and secured the boot through five pairs of eyelets below, and four pairs of hooks above (other combinations do exist though). The leather tongue was sewn up to the upper edge. A leather semicircular cap was sewn on at the heel part extending 4.5-5.5 cm in height. There was a 2.5 cm reinforcing leather band above the sole around the sides and the front. The rear seam was covered by a leather band. A double laid web strap was inserted at the rear between the leather and the lining, and measured 2 cm wide and 9 cm long, reaching 5 cm above the edge. This was omitted in 1940.

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The double sole protruded all around for 5 mm, and was studded with nails whose studs reached through the soles. There were seven studnails side by side in the front, six on the inside, and eight on the outside set in pairs, with each pair 2 cm distant. Between the front and lateral nails was a pair of metal plates attached to each side by pins and small screws to protect the boots when used with skis. The forward sole was nailed with 25-30 hobnails in a rhombic pattern. The 1.5 cm high heels were grooved to hold the ski binding. The edges of the heels were also nail-studded-3 - 6 on the front edge and 18 -21 evenly distributed along the side and rear edge. The sole of the heels was usually nailed with 12 hobnails set in a rhombic pattern.

 

Lace up ankle boots
schnürschuhe

In mid-1940, the marching boots began to be replaced by ankle-length laced boots (Schnurschuh) as leather shortages made the taller marching boots more difficult to produce in large numbers. Worn in conjunction with either short anklets in field-grey or khaki, or captured British canvas anklets in a buff colour. (The anklets were given the rather sardonic nickname of "retreat puttees" or "Timoshenko socks", after a Russian general.)

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anklets

The short boot was initially issued to second-line troops; the front-line soldier retained the high boot. From 1943, however, the ankle boot was issued whenever the high boot needed replacing. By late in the war the latter was generally seen only on officers and rear-echelon troops. Photos show that the anklets/puttees were rarely worn in the front lines; most soldiers either wore the trousers loose over the boots, or tucked into socks.

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They ware made of smooth blackened leather and have five pair of lace up eyelets, followed by four pair of lace hooks – although other combinations do exist. The shoes have stacked leather heels with metal horseshoe plates, and forward soles with hobnails, and metal toe plates.

Tropical lace up boots
tropen schnürschuhe

Developed in late 1940 along with other items of tropical clothing and equipment for use in the North African campaign. Olive drab canvas uppers and leg panels with multi-piece light brown leather foot, ankle reinforcements and vertical reverse seam reinforcement strip.

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M1942 boots
winterstiefel

The M1942 boots were made of heavy felt and leather. They were considered superior to the Russian felt boots on which they were modelled after, the leather being more waterproof in conditions of weting and freezing.

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PST 4004 flight boots
flieger pelzstiefel

Aircrew were issued with fur-lined boots (introduced on September 22ND 1937) that were normally intended to be worn for flights that exceeded a height of 10,000 feet. Though well-suited for cold weather, they afforded no protection against fractures and joint injuries when bailing out, and were unsuitable for walking any distance. The early-war fleece-lined flying boot was worn throughout the war. The foot and uppers were manufactured from black leather, with the leg section made of soft black suede leather reinforced with black leather strips. Two vertical zippers ran the length of the leg section, with the top of the boot being secured by a leather strap. A second strap ran across the top of the foot, with the buckle near the ankle. Some had attached to the top of the boots a pull out leather pad with two snap connectors for hook up to heated flight suit. The 24 volt heating element was placed inside the foot section and feeded of wires which run from the connector down. During the summer months, fighter pilots often wore the standard-issue high boot with breeches while on operations.

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Socks
socken

Socks were made of gray - or olive green wool. There were 4 sizes what could be seen on the white size rings near the top edge.

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