Early Medieval Lancasters

Below, I try to summarize the people referred to as being of Lancaster in the 12-14th centuries, and not known to be related to the best known Lancaster family of that time, the de Lancasters of Kendal. This is a page of notes, related to other Lancaster webpages listed here.


In this period it is very difficult to determine when a placename is being used as a true surname, let along one that had stuck fast to a family such that it would continue to be passed down to later generations.


Technical note, in order to read Google Books references, it may be necessary to work via www.proxify.com


Furness Abbey.

In the following two cases there is no evidence that Lancaster was being used as a surname.

The third recorded abbot of Furness Abbey in the early 12th century was one Michael of (de) Lancaster. This would have been 1140s, when William de Lancaster I of Kendal may not have yet been using the surname.

Tocka de Loncastre was one of the monks in that period that left Furness to inhabit a new establishment in Calder in Coupland.

References:

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=39958&strquery=tocka

http://www.york.ac.uk/inst/bihr/Publications/Jervaulxsample.pdf


Robert de Lancaster.

Robert was a personal name which had been used by the family of the first William de Lancaster, also known as William son of Gilbert, of the Kendal family. His brothers, mentioned in the Register of St Bees, are Robert son of Gilbert and Roger son of Gilbert. Roger married Sigrid, widow of Waldeve of Allerdale, but he had already had a son by another wife it seems, also named Robert. There is no evidence that these families used the surname Lancaster, but one relative, a nephew of William de Lancaster I, and therefore presumably son of one of his brothers, did take up the surname: Warine de Lancaster.

Later, probably in the early 1200s, a Robert de Lancaster appears as a witness to some charters involving the sons of Warine de Lancaster. Might he have been a son of Warine, or perhaps a nephew?

See

The Chartulary of Cockersand Abbey Vol. II, Part I, 1898 Ed. William Farrer. Chetham Vol.40 (NS) page 339 and 343.

The Chartulary of Cockersand Abbey Vol. II, Part II, 1900 Ed. William Farrer. Chetham Vol.43 (NS) page 741.

It was probably the same Robert, a knight, who took part in the survey of Lancashire which led to the creation of the so called Testa de Neville. This survey is thought to have happened about 1200-1207. (This estimate is made here: Mamecestre: Being Chapters from the Early Recorded History of the Barony etc. Vol. I; by John Harland, 1891 Chetham LIII)


Much later, we have another Robert de Lancaster who needs further investigation. He was appointed bishop of Sts Kentigern and Asaph in Wales, in 1411, and sometimes thought Welsh. However, perhaps he is the same one mentioned in Garstang, near Lancaster, in 1369.


Richard de Lancaster

In 1202, Margaret, relict of Richard de Lancaster, released her dower claim upon tenements in Parbold, Wrightington and Moston, to Robert son of Bernard, thegn of Goosnargh; and Orm and Roger, sons of Roger de Burton (of Burton in Kendal). This Roger also appears to have been called de Wrightington and de Ashton, and was a son of Orm of Ashton. It is thought that Richard and Margaret therefore had two daughters, one who married the thegn of Goosnargh, and the other who married Roger son of Orm.

References:

Farrer 1899, Feet of Fines....Page 18 and Page 19

Farrer 1903, the Great Inquest of 1212...

Page 55.

Albert Gredle, senex, gave the fee of one knight to Orm, son of Ailward, in marriage with Emma, his daughter, that is in Dalton, and Perbold, and Wrictinton. The heirs of that Orm hold the aforesaid land.

Albert Grelley, the eldest, was the father of Robert Grelley, whose name occurs in the Lindsey Survey, circa 1115-8. It is probable that this fee, situate in Leyland Hundred, somewhat remote from Manchester, had been given to Albert Grelley by Henry I. upon the creation of the Honour of Lancaster, and that the said Albert had subsequently bestowed it upon Orm, son of Ailward, with other estates upon the latter's marriage to his daughter. Proof that Orm, son of Ailward, was ancestor in a direct line of Kirkby, of Kirkby-Irleth in Furness, has been given in Lanc. Pipe Rolls, pp. 403 et seqq. During the century preceding this inquest numerous infeudations had been made by the Kirkbys in these three manors, some possibly as gifts in frank marriage. So far as we have been able to obtain particulars, these manors were probably held as follows in 1212 :—DAI.TON—Richard, son of Robert de Lathom ; Henry, son of Bernard de Parbold (probably first cousin of Richard de Lathom), Richard de Orell, and Richard le Waleys of Uplitherland, each one fourth part. PARBOLD—Henry, son of Bernard de Parbold, and Roger, son of Henry (de Lathom?), each a moiety. WRIGHTINGTON— Roger, son of William de Kirkby, the heirs of Robert, son of Bernard de Goosnargh, Roger, son of Orm de Ashton (sometimes called Roger de Wrightington and sometimes Roger de Burton), and Richard, son of Roben de Lathom, each one fourth part.

Page 57.

Albert Gredle, senior, gave to Orm, son of Eiward, with his daughter Emma in marriage j. carucate of land in Eston by xj. yearly. The heirs of this Orm hold that land.

This carucate comprised one moiety of Ashton-under-Lyne. Roger, son of William de Kirkby, was mesne tenant here at this time, being great-grandson of Orm, whose son and heir, Roger, son of Orm, had received a grant of "all the land of Ashton" from Albert Grelley II. (1154-62, Lane. Pipe Rolls, p. 403). It can hardly be doubted that senex should have been written here for senior after the grantor's name. The inquest appears to have overlooked the grant of the other moiety of Ashton to Roger, son of Orm. Nor is mention made of the fact that Thomas, son of Orm de Ashton, was tenant under Kirkby at the time of the inquest.

Farrer 1905, Cockersand Chartulary, III, 2. Page 1004

Farrer 1898, Cockersand Chartulary, II, 1. Page 501

Farrer 1905. Final Concords. Page 172 and Page 173


William Farrer felt that it was very likely that Richard was a member of the family of Kirkby of Kirkby Ireleth, who had held these three vills since their ancestor Orm (of Kirkby Ireleth) son of Ailward married Emma, the daughter of Albert Grelley. According to Farrer (but not before 1902), Roger son of Orm of Ashton-under-Lyne must not be confounded with Roger, son of Orm son of Ailward, of Kirkby Ireleth "whose son and heir, William, had succeeded his father before 1163". For his 1902 argumentation see Lancashire Pipe Rolls and Early Lancashire Charters...

http://books.google.com/books?id=3nIDAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA403

http://books.google.com/books?id=3nIDAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA404

http://books.google.com/books?id=3nIDAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA405

http://books.google.com/books?id=3nIDAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA406 , this being the most crucial page

http://books.google.com/books?id=3nIDAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA409

http://books.google.com/books?id=3nIDAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA410

...also...

http://books.google.com/books?id=7YcgbfjdP3kC&pg=RA1-PA29

http://books.google.com/books?id=7YcgbfjdP3kC&pg=RA1-PA30


Also see an earlier author http://books.google.com/books?id=tL1nsjpJkj8C&pg=PA12


It would be very interesting if we could be certain that families like Kirkby of Kirkby Ireleth used the surname Lancaster. They were apparently underlords of the Lancasters in Furness and used blazonry which seems to be clearly based on theirs. (See our Lancaster Heraldry webpage.) On the other hand how do we know that, for example, it was not Margaret who was the Kirkby?


An interesting point whereof I am not aware of any particular discussion ever being made is that due to his possession of Lupton, Roger de Burton, mentioned above, could also thought to have married an heiress of Adam de Lancaster, Dean of Lancaster, mentioned below, while this theory being discussed here has him marrying a daughter of Richard de Lancaster. Could this daughter have been an heir of Adam, or more generally might Richard de Lancaster, or perhaps his wife, be a close relative of Adam the Dean? See below and also: http://books.google.com/books?id=8vcMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA1005


However Farrer and Curwen apparently came to believe that "Roger de Burton appears to have derived his estate from Gilbert de Tours, or "Turribus," lord of Lowick, co. Lancaster, and superior tenant of part of Hutton Roof." This Gilbert was the son of a man named Ketel, and had initially used the name "de Huttonruf". This conclusion apparently comes from an observation of how Roger came to his possessions in the related manor of Hutton Roof: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=49326&strquery=hutton%20roof


It is not clear who Ketel was, but as it happens, an important Ketel made a grant in Hutton Roof at about the right time to be Gilbert's father. This was Ketel fitz Eldred, a reputed ancestor of the de Lancasters of Cumbria.


Adam de Lancaster.

1. The de Lea.

One Adam de Lancaster living around 1200, is known to be a son of Warine de Lancaster and a brother of Henry. Both Adam and Henry came to refer to their family, it seems, as "de Lea". Adam had another brother Roger, and Robert de Lancaster, possibly a relative as mentioned above, witnessed some of their charters.


2. The Deacon.

We should also mention the reference on at least one occasion to an Adam de Lancaster who appears to be the same as Adam the dean or deacon (decanus), who appears frequently in charters.

According to Farrer there were two deacons named Adam at a similar time, one of Kirkham or Amoundernesse, and the other, the one we are interested in, of Lancaster or Lonsdale. He may also have been referred to as Adam de Lupton. This latter is then theorized to be in the family which held Tatham, that of Waldeve of Ulverston, father of Augustin de Heaton and Richard de Tatham, as well as this Adam. Neither are apparently thought to be the same as Adam d'Avranches anymore?

Adam was dean from about 1184-1206.

http://books.google.com/books?id=OEcJAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA98

http://books.google.com/books?id=cR9oHxhkhLcC&pg=PA17

http://books.google.com/books?id=8vcMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA930

http://books.google.com/books?id=8vcMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA991.

"In 1184 Adam the Dean proffered 100s, for licence to marry his daughter, who was of the King's donation, to the son of Norman de Redman (Lanes. Pipe Rolls, p. 52)."

http://books.google.com/books?id=8vcMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA992

http://books.google.com/books?id=8vcMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA993. He held land in Lupton, and may have been referred to as Adam de Lupton.


Concerning the connection of this man to Lupton, see Gilbert de Lancaster, below.

3. The Cumbrian.

One Adam de Lancaster was granted seisin in a transfer between Roger de Lancaster of Rydale and Furness Abbey.


Perhaps the same Adam was the one in Kirkby in Kendal in 4 Edward I (1275/6)...

http://books.google.com/books?id=fgIrAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA220

m. 7 (22). Kirkby (Westmorel.) ; appointment of John de Reygate and William de Northburgh to take the assise of novel disseisin arraigned by Robert Fitz-Geoffrey against Adam (or Ada) de Lancaster and Adam (or Ada) Fizorm, touching a tenement in.

m. 7 (33). Kirkby Kendal (Westmorel.) ; appointment of John de Reygate and William de Northburgh to take the assise of novel disseisin arraigned by Robert Fitz-Geoffrey against Adam (or Ada) de Lancaster and Adam (or Ada) Fitz-Огme, touching a tenement in.

4. In Ireland.

http://books.google.com/books?lr=&id=Xt4HAAAAQAAJ

An Adam son of Adam de Lancaster was given royal authority and protection in the late 1300s for participation in an invasion of Ireland?

5. In Overton

An Adam de Lancaster, son of William de Lancaster, transferred 40 acres of land in Overton to the Lawrences of Ashton in 1373. This makes him sound like a relative, and therefore perhaps a member of the family of the Lancasters of Kendal.

http://books.google.com/books?id=s0cJAAAAIAAJ&pg=RA1-PA83

http://books.google.com/books?id=s0cJAAAAIAAJ&pg=RA1-PA84

It appears that William held of his wife Blanche, who was possibly the heiress of Robert the Greave...

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=53264#n8

http://books.google.com/books?id=s0cJAAAAIAAJ&pg=RA1-PA125

...or should we not read it to be saying that it was held of Blanche, the wife of John, Duke of Lancaster, in other words, John of Gaunt?

6. The family of Harold.

There was a family containing Adam who we can identify from several records. Harolda de Lancastra, fined in 1185, (2 marks "pro vaccariis in foresta") had two sons, Adam and Orm. A Haraldus de Loncastre appears in a roll of Henry II for Dublin. See http://books.google.com/books?id=c0YNAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA13


http://books.google.com/books?id=aZKTSv580u8C&pg=PA319

Sciant presentes et futuri quod ego Adam filius Haraldi de Lanc[astre] ex assensu et concensu Agnetis sponse mee dedi, concessi et hac present! carta mea confirmavi Rogero capellano filio Cassandre de Lancastr[e], unani dimidiam acram terre mee in territorio dc Lanc[astre] jacentis scilicet in cultura que voca- turle Milenefeld scilicet inter terram Gerard! capellani et regalem viam que ducit apud Gargorham. Tenendam et habendam de me et heredibus meis sibi vel cuic.um que assignare voluerit legare vel vendere et in quacunque hora voluerit libere, quiete, integre, pacifice et honorifice cum omnibus pertinenciis suis, libertatibus et aysiamentis dicte terre pertinentibus. Reddendo inde annuatim michi et heredibus meis ipse vel cuicunque dare, legare, vendere, vel assignare voluerit unum par cirothecarum vel unum obolum argent! ad festum Sancti Michaelis pro omni servicio, exaccione et demanda. Et ego Adam et heredes mei totam predictam dimidiam acram terre cum pertinenciis dicto Rogero vel cuicunque dare, legare, vendere, vel assignare voluerit contra omnes homines et feminas imperpetuum warantizabimus. Et pro hac donacione, concessione, et carte hujus confirmacione predictus Rogerus dedit michi xxli solidos argenti in mea magna necessitate pre manibus. In hujus rei testimonium ego Adam sigillum meum huic scripto apposui. Hiis testibus—Thoma de Coupmanwra, Rogero de Heton, Johanne de Oxclyve, Gervasio de Oxclyve, clerico, Thoma filio Roger!, Willelmo filio Johannis, tune prepositis Lancastrie, Johanne le Paneter, Willelmo Orto- lano, et aliis.

[TRANSLATION.]

Know present and to come that I, Adam, son of Harold of Lancaster, with the assent and consent of Agnes my wife, have given, granted, and by this my present charter have confirmed, to Roger the chaplain, son of Cassandra of Lancaster, one half acre of my land in the territory of Lancaster, lying, namely, in the culture which is called the Millfield, to wit, between the land of Gerard the chaplain and the high way which leads to Gargorham (?). To hold and to have of me and my heirs, to him or to whomsoever he shall wish to assign, bequeath, or sell it, and whensoever he shall wish, freely, quietly, entirely, peacefully and honourably, with all its appurtenances, liberties and easements pertaining to the said land. Rendering therefor annually to me and my heirs, he, or any one to whom he shall wish to give, bequeath, sell or assign it, a pair of gloves or a half-penny in money at the feast of St. Michael, for all service, exaction and demand. And I, Adam, and my heirs, will warrant all the aforesaid half acre of land, with the appurtenances, to the said Roger, or to whomsoever he shall wish to give, bequeath, sell or assign it, against all men and women for ever. And for this gift, grant, and confirmation of this charter, the aforesaid Roger has given me in hand twenty shillings of silver in my great necessity. In testimony hereof I, Adam, have set my seal to this writing. These being witnesses—Thomas of Capernvvray, Roger of Heaton, John of Oxcliffe, Gervase of Oxcliffe, clerk, Thomas son of Roger, William son of John, then reeves of Lancaster, John le Paneter, William Ortolanus, and others.

Dated to 1236-1262? See http://books.google.com/books?id=yf8qAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA172

http://books.google.com/books?id=aZKTSv580u8C&pg=PA313

Sciant presentes et futuri quod ego Orm[us] filius Haraldi de Lancastr[e] dedi, concessi hac present! carta mea confirmavi Gylemino ffrancisco quondam servienti Domini Prioris Lanc- [astrie] unam acram terre in territorio de Lancastr[e] illam videlicet quam emi de Ada fratre meo. Tenendam et haben- dam de me et heredibus meis sibi et ejus assignatis libere et quiete, pacifice et integre, cum omnibus libertatibus et aysia- mentis infra villam de Lancastr[e] et extra pertinentibus. Ego vero dictus Orm [us] et heredes mei dictam acram terre cum pertinenciis prenominato Gylemino et ejus assignatis contra omnes homines et feminas pro tribus marcis argenti michi a predicto Gylemino in mea necessitate datis imperpetuum waran- tizabimus. In cujus rei testimonium sigillum meum pro me et heredibus meis huic scripto apposui. Hiis testibus—Laurencio filio Willelmi, tune tempore Senescallo domini Prioris Lancastrie, Rogero filio Fulconis, Thoma filio Rogeri, Conne, tune tempore prepositis Lancastrie; Pagano Nimca,(?) Waltero Ruffb, Willelmo clerico, Willelmo filio Johannis, Roberto filio Hugonis, cum tota curia Lancastrie, et aliis.

[TRANSLATION.]

Know present and to come that I, Orm, son of Harold of Lancaster, have given, granted, and by this my present charter have confirmed, to Gylemin Francis, formerly a servant of the lord the Prior of Lancaster, an acre of land in the territory of Lancaster, that, namely, which I bought of Adam my brother. To hold and to have of me and my heirs, to him and his assigns, freely and quietly, peacefully and entirely, with all liberties and easements pertaining, within the vill of Lancaster and without. And I, the said Orm, and my heirs for ever will warrant the said acre of land, with the appurtenances, to the aforenamed Gylemin and his assigns, against all men and women, for three marks of silver given to me by the aforesaid Gylemin in my necessity. In testimony whereof I, for me and my heirs, have set my seal to this writing. These being witnesses—Laurence fitz William, then Seneschal of the lord the Prior of Lancaster; Roger son of Fulk, Thomas son of Roger Conne, then reeves of Lancaster; Pain Nimca,(?) Walter Ruffus, William the clerk, William son of John, Robert son of Hugh, with the whole court of Lancaster, and others.


http://books.google.com/books?id=yf8qAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA172

94. S.D. [1236-1262.] Grant in frankalmóign, from Adam, eon of Harald de Lancaster, to the abbot and monks of St. Mary of Furness, of all his hind in Milnfeld, described by bounds. Witnesses: Thomas de Coupmanewra, Hugh de Mitton, William, of Furness, of land in Botheltun, site and particulars described. Witnesses: Henry de • i * " Redeman, Walter de l'arles, Robert de Boivill, Henry, parson of Bothelton, Robert, parson of Claghton, Thomas Rufus, and Gilbert Rufus of Bothelton. (Seal.)

7. The family of Simon the Chaplain: a Simpson family?

Another family tree we can sketch, is that which seems to start with Simon of Lancaster, chaplain, adult in 28 Edward I (1299-1300). His family were referred to as "de Lancaster" for at least a few generations.

http://books.google.com/books?id=eojza_v9LzMC&pg=RA3-PA129

http://books.google.com/books?id=9xQHAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA243


...who had a son Adam (adult in 13 Ed II, meaning 1319-20)...

http://books.google.com/books?id=31EJAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA156


...who had a son William (adult 20 Ed. III, which was 1346-47). He appears to have been in various types of trouble.

http://books.google.com/books?id=jrxkdMDuLusC&pg=PA391

http://sdrc.lib.uiowa.edu/patentrolls/e3v4/body/Edward3vol4page0367.pdf

http://sdrc.lib.uiowa.edu/patentrolls/e3v4/body/Edward3vol4page0337.pdf


They may have taken up the surname Simmesson, as shown on p.171 of the following ("William son of Adam Simmesson")...

http://www.archive.org/stream/recordsociety70recouoft


Gilbert de Lancaster.

Held land near Morecombe, Poulton etc.

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=53265 . About 1277 and 1285.

http://books.google.com/books?id=nAMrAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA256


May be the same as Gilbert de Lancaster, Cleric?

http://books.google.com/books?id=J7E0AAAAIAAJ&pg=PA155

http://books.google.com/books?id=2fcMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA825

http://books.google.com/books?id=5UYJAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA451

http://books.google.com/books?id=5UYJAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA452

http://books.google.com/books?id=-ygNAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA735

One of these is dated here: http://books.google.com/books?id=whssAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA20


Notice that the land he granted in Lancaster to Cockersand had previously been held by William son of Roger.


About 1268-1275, a William, son of Gilbert the clerk, held land in Lupton, where an Adam de Lancaster (see above) seems to have held land a generation or two earlier. The original Latin record adds that "A confirmation charter of Roger de Burton touching Lupton will be found amongst the charters of Wrightington, in Leyland hundred". Concerning an earlier Roger de Burton, also known as Roger of Wrightington, or Roger son of Orm, of Ashton, see above under the Richard heading. The Burton family may have acquired their Lupton holdings from an heiress of Adam de Lancaster, Dean of Lancaster, and/or with a daughter of Richard de Lancaster, or perhaps they had seperate holdings which came from Gilbert de Turribus. This is discussed above.

http://books.google.com/books?id=8vcMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA995


http://books.google.com/books?id=d_AMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA315

To all who shall see or hear this writing, Helewise, daughter of John, son of Gilbert of Lancaster, greeting. Know ye that I have given, granted, and by this my present writing have confirmed, and altogether quit-claimed from me and my heirs for ever, to William, son of Roger, all the whole right and claim which I have, had, or can have in a burgage, with the appurtenances, in the vill of Lancaster; in that, to wit, which William, son of John, formerly held. So that neither I, Helewise, nor my heirs, nor any one through us may from henceforth have, demand, or lay claim to any right or claim in the aforesaid burgage, with the appurtenances, in all the land which John, son of Gilbert of Lancaster, formerly held, against the aforesaid William, his heirs or assigns. In testimony whereof I have put my seal to this present writing. These being witnesses — William son of Julian of Lancaster, Master Thomas of Kirkham, John of Oxcliffe, Gervase of Oxcliffe, Laurence son of Thomas, Lambert son of John, and others.


Nicholas de Lancaster

A man of this name represented Lancaster in parliament in 1328.


John de Lancaster,

1. The MP

In the first half of the 1300s, a John de Lancaster held many important positions in Lancashire. The one who went to parliament seems to be the son of Roger de Lancaster of Rydal, and his ancestry is pretty well known. But was he the same man who managed the lands of the late Thomas de Lancaster, the royal rebel? Everybody assumes so. In the war against Scotland he seems to have been trusted with money.


But then who was the John who married the widow of William Slene? William also went to parliament along with a John de Lancaster.


And why did similar commissions keep getting given to a John de Lancaster in Lancashire after the well-known John had died? See these patent rolls entries:

Edward III, vol. 3, p. 368 1336, Oct 16, Auckland

Edward III, vol. 4, p. 272 1339, Feb 7, Westminster

Edward III, vol. 4, p. 280 1339, April 1, Berkhamstead

Edward III, vol. 4, p. 360 1339, Sept 10, Windsor

Edward III, vol. 4, p. 366 1339, Nov 18, Langley

Edward III, vol. 5, p. 98 1340, Oct 6, Andover

Edward III, vol. 5, p. 179 1341, April 2, Westminster


Some of John's property in Westmorland had gone to John de Lancaster of Howgill, but this man was more of a Westmorlander with little apparent connection to Lancashire (he did marry into Caton however). And he is often mentioned in Patent Rolls, always concerning Westmorland affairs, with "of Howgill" being made specific.


The only other well-known John de Lancaster is the one who possessed a part of Rainhill, via his marriage with a de Molyneux. He used the same arms as the family of John had used, but as with many families we know very little about their background.


There seem to be more Johns. For evidence that one lived near Clitheroe, near Bowland also near some important possessions of Thomas de Lancaster, sites of some important John de Lancaster commissions, see p. 37 of http://www.archive.org/stream/recordsociety70recouoft


2. In Highfield, husband of Alice, widow of William de Slene.

We should consider the history of Highfield in Lancaster, which seems to have had various Lancaster families interested in it...

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=53258

HIGHFIELD was in 1212 held by Roger son of John, whose duty or office it was to sharpen the plough-shares for two of the lord's manors each year. (fn. 28) This service was afterwards commuted to a rent of 5s. About 1222 the land was held by Walter son of Walter the Smith and William son of William the Smith. (fn. 29) William son of William son of Juliana was the tenant in 1297, paying 5s. rent, (fn. 30) and was still living in 1314, when as Master William son of William son of Juliana he granted a burgage to Adam le Purser and Joan his wife at 12d. rent. (fn. 31)

Soon afterwards the estate passed to William de Slene in right of Alice his wife, he being tenant in 1323 by rendering 5s. a year in lieu of the ancient service of sharpening the lord's plough-shares. (fn. 32) He died the following year, leaving a son and heir named William, only seven years old. (fn. 33) Alice as widow put forward a claim for dower in 1325. (fn. 34) She demised a burgage in 1329, the services required from the occupier being a rent of 9s. and the finding of two labourers to reap for one day. (fn. 35) For her second husband she married John de Lancaster, husband and wife and William her son being concerned in a lease of land in 1338. (fn. 36)

28 Lancs. Inq. and Extents, i, 89, 126. The name Highfield does not occur till much later.

29 Ibid. 126. Two acres were granted to Adam de Kellet or his ancestor, who was in 1247–51 to pay his rent of 6d. directly to the lord of the honour, and another 2 acres to the Prior of Lancaster; ibid. 182. Reginald the Smith was then holder.

30 Ibid. 291. Thomas de Lancaster in 1304 claimed 24 acres from William son of William son of Juliana de Lancaster; De Banco R. 149, m. 330.

31 Towneley MS. C 8, 13 (Chet. Lib.), L 266.

32 Lancs. Inq. and Extents, ii, 117. William de Slene had married Alice, whose parentage is not recorded, by 1304, when they claimed an acre in Lancaster against Robert Oliver; De Banco R. 151, m. 59 d. The defendant may be the Robert son of Oliver de Lancaster of a pleading of 1301; Assize R. 419, m. 13. Again in 1307 William de Slene and Alice called Lawrence son of Robert Oliver to warrant them in a claim for dower put forward by Nichola, Robert's widow; De Banco R. 162, m. 198. William and Alice de Slene obtained land in 1317; C 8, 13, H 421. Thomas Lambert, son of Lambert the Dispenser, granted a grange, &c., to William de Slene in 1319; ibid. L 270. The names Yahendale (?), Eltenbreck, Langlands and Hungerhill occur in the charter.

33 Inq. p.m. 18 Edw. II, no. 23.

34 De Banco R. 257, m. 109.

35 Kuerden fol. MS. (Chet. Lib.), 380. In 1331 Alice was defendant to a claim by Roger son of Thomas de Lancaster of Kendal; De Banco R. 248, m. 292; 288, m. 309.

36 Towneley MS. C 8, 13, L 258.

...so there was some interaction with a Kendal Lancaster, with Thomas in 1304 presumably the father of Roger in 1331.

http://books.google.com/books?id=aZKTSv580u8C&pg=PA316

Omnibus Christ! fidelibus ad quos presens scriptum pervenerit Jdus(?) filius Willelmi filii Alicie de Lancastr[e] salutem. Noveri- tis me pro salute anime mee et animarum predecessorum et suc- cessorum meorum concessisse, dedisse et presenti carta mea confirmasse Deo et ecclesie beate Marie de Lanc[astre], Priori et monachis ibidem Deo servientibus, tres acras terre mee in campo s de Hehfeld propinquius jacentes terre dicti Prioris in eodem campo ex parte meridional! in puram et perpetuam elemosinam. Tenendas et habendas predictis Priori et monachis et eorum successoribus in adeo puram et perpetuam elemosinam sicut aliqua terra liberius et quiecius dari potest. Et ego Jdus(?) et heredes mei vel mei assignati predictas tres acras terre cum suis pertinenciis memoratis Priori et monachis et eorum successoribus contra omnes mortales warantizabimus et defendemus imper- petuum. In cujus rei testimonium presenti scripto sigillum meum duxi apponendum. Hiis testibus — domino Rogero capellano Prioris Lancastrie, Thoma de Kyrkeham, Magistro Scolarum Lancastr[ie], Radulpho de Oxclyve, Hugone Swan, Alexandra Swan, Hugone quondam serviente Lancastrie, et aliis.

[TRANSLATION.] To all the faithful of Christ to whom this present writing shall come, Idus,(?) son of William, son of Alice of Lancaster, greeting. Know ye that I, for the welfare of my soul and of the souls of my predecessors and successors, have granted, given, and by this my present charter confirmed, to God and the church of the Blessed Mary of Lancaster, the Prior and monks there serving God, in pure and perpetual alms, three acres of my land in the field of Highfield, lying next to the land of the said Prior in the same field on the south part. To hold and to have to the aforesaid Prior and monks and their successors, in as pure and perpetual alms as any land can be freely and quietly granted. And I, Idus,(?) and my heirs or my assigns, will warrant and defend the aforesaid three acres of land, with their appurtenances, to the said Prior and monks and their successors, against all mortals for ever. In testimony whereof I have caused my seal to be set to this present writing. These being witnesses— Roger, chaplain of the Prior of Lancaster ; Thomas of Kirkham, master of the scholars of Lancaster; Ralph de Oxcliffe, Hugh Swan, Alexander Swan, Hugh, late sergeant of Lancaster, and others.

In 1338 John de Lancaster and Alice his wife demised a burgage in Market-gate on lease at a rent of 10s., the tenant to find a man for reaping for one day each year and to build a new stable within three years; Kuerden fol. MS. p. 245.

...We also know that the Rainhill Lancasters were involved in the same area of town, and had several Johns, apparently 3 in a row...

ref. DDTO O (2)/71  - date: 1345-6. John de Whitington, chaplain, to John Laurence of Assheton & w. Eliz. & son Edmund; one burgage in the vill of Lancaster, lying upon the corner of Penystrete between the burgage of John s. of John de Lancastr

ref.  DDK/1406/3  - date: 30 Edward III., A.D. 1356. John de Lancaster to John, the son of John Laurans of Lancaster: "Agreement respecting lands and burgages in Lancaster."

ref.  DDK/1406/4  - date: 36 Edward III., A.D. 1362. John, son of John de Lancaster, to William, son of Adam de Lancaster: "Release of a burgage in Penistrete in the town of Lancaster."

ref.  DDK/1406/5  - date: 43 Edward III., A.D. 1369. John, son of John, son of John de Lancaster of Rainhill, to John de Eaton of Lancaster: "Release of a rent of 6s. 8d. out of a burgage in Market Street in Lancaster." 

Above we see how the Rainhill Lancasters were associated with a burgage on Market Street, also known as Market Gate, and also possibly Penny Street. These were two of the main thoroughfares. Others were St Mary Gate (later Church Street) and St Leonards Gate. Some other Lancaster records are possibly relevant...

Another John and Alice.

About 1313 John son of Thomas son of William de Aldcliffe gave land in the town fields (Wolstreharve and Jurdanheld) to John de Lancaster and Alice his wife; ibid. no. 354. Jurdanheld is named in an earlier deed (ibid. no. 388); it may be the Jurdanhead adjoining Longlands of a grant by James Kellet to John Hubersty in 1490; Pal. of Lanc. Plea R. 69, m. 6.


Alfred and Gerard

http://books.google.com/books?id=2fcMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA824


Gerard was apparently a cleric, and like Gilbert de Lancaster the cleric he apparently held land once held by William son of Roger.


Williams


1. William son of Adam.

One William, a son of Adam, is mentioned above.


2. William son of William son of Julian(a)

We can further consider the family that seems to have preceeded William de Slene and Alice in Highfield.

In 1299 William son of William son of Juliana de Lancaster gave part of a burgage in Penny Street (bought by his father from Orm de Kellet) to Walter son of Grimbald in free marriage with Alice daughter of Simon the Goldsmith by Emmota, grantor's sister; Towneley MS. HH, no. 350, 372.

In 1312–13 William son of William son of Juliana de Lancaster demised to Adam son of Richard de Cockerham for life a burgage in St. Marygate occupied by William de Ashton; ibid. 245. In the following year the same grantor gave to Adam the Purser of Lancaster and Joan his wife another burgage in the street, situate between the burgages of Adam son of Simon and Thomas the Leather-dresser, to hold to farm of the chief lords at 12d. rent; ibid. 247.


Concerning William's father...


http://books.google.com/books?id=aZKTSv580u8C&pg=PA317

To all the faithful of Christ who shall see or hear this writing, William, son of Julian of Lancaster, greeting. Know ye that I, for the welfare of my soul and of the souls of my predecessors and successors, have granted, given, and by my present charter have confirmed, to God and the church of the Blessed Mary of Lancaster, to the Prior and monks there serving God, half an acre of land, with the appurtenances, in the territory of Lancaster, lying between the land which William, late servant of the Prior of Lancaster, gave to the said priory, and the land which Nicholas the dyer gave, at the same time, to the said priory. To hold and to have the said half acre of land, with the appurtenances, in as pure and perpetual alms as any land can be freely and quietly given and granted ; so that neither I, nor any of my heirs, can from henceforth demand or lay claim to any right or claim in the said land, but only a share of the good things which shall be done in the aforesaid church. And I, William, and my heirs, will warrant and defend the said half acre of land, with the appurtenances, to the aforesaid Prior and monks and their successors, against all men for ever. In testimony whereof I have set my seal to the present writing. These being witnesses—Sir William of Heaton, Alan of Catherton, John of Oxcliffe, John le Gentyle, Thomas of Paries, Robert son of Pain,(?) William son of Laurence, Robert son of Oliver, and many others.

William son of Roger also appears with the following witnesses:

Master Thomas of Kirkham, John of Oxcliffe, Gervase of Oxcliffe, Laurence son of Thomas, Lambert son of John

Sir Benedict Gernet, Sir W. of Heaton, Alan of Catherton, John of Oxcliffe, John le Gentyle, and Robert son of Pain, then reeves of Lancaster, William of Bensted

John of Oxcliffe, John le Gentyle, William of Oxcliffe, Laurence son of Thomas, William son of Laurence, Lambert Despenser, Robert Oliver

John le Gentyle, Laurence son of Thomas, Lambert Despencer, then bailiff of Lancaster, William son of Laurence, Robert son of Pain, Adam of Northbreck

John le Gentil, Laurence son of Thomas, Lambert Despencer, Robert Oliver, Robert Payn, Robert de Catherton

3. William son of Roger.

There is are also several relatively significant looking records of a William son of Roger in the Lancaster area. It should perhaps be mentioned that there was also a Thomas son of Roger who was an ancestor of the Lawrences of Ashton. The problem here is that there seem to be no less than 3 Roger de Lancasters in the 1200s:

(So none of them are particularly closely related to Lancaster itself.)


The one near Lancaster gave land which was between that of Thomas son of Roger, presumably the ancestor of the Lawrences, and Gilemayn the prior, who had received his land, it seems, from the family of Harold de Lancaster (above). Indeed, William son of Roger had been one of the reeves who witnessed Adam son of Harold's charters. Could this William be the same as William the son of Roger de Croftes, who had previously held land which William son of Phillip, carpenter of Lancaster, gave to St Mary's inside Lancaster and without?

Roger de Croftes may be the same as the falconer to John of Mortain who is also said to be ancestor of the Southworth family. They held land in Derby. Roger is also thought to be the same as Roger de Burton?

http://books.google.com/books?id=xdsgysln66MC&pg=PA2193 and

http://books.google.com/books?id=BmQQAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA70 and

http://books.google.com/books?id=OEcJAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA199

Also, land which had been held by William son of Roger de Lancaster was granted by Gilbert de Lancaster. The land in question was next to William Ortolan's in Market Street. See above. Concerning this William:

William son of Matthew in 1212 held a messuage and land by gardenry (fn. 82) ; he is afterwards called William the Gardener, (fn. 83) and may have been an ancestor of John Gardiner the benefactor, but the surname is common in the district. The service was afterwards commuted to 5s. a year, by which the estate was held in 1297 by the heir of William the Gardener. (fn. 84) William de Slene held it in 1346, (fn. 85) and thus it may have become merged in Highfield.

William son of Roger seems related to Thomas son of Robert. See http://books.google.com/books?id=d_AMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA326

To all who shall see or hear this writing, Thomas, son of Robert, son of Mawe of Lancaster, greeting. Know ye that I have granted, remised, and by this present writing have for ever quit-claimed, to the church of the Blessed Mary of Lancaster, to the Prior and monks there serving God, all the right and claim which I had, or by any right can have, in all the lands and tenements which William son of Roger, my grandfather, formerly gave to the same Prior and monks, so forsooth that neither I, Thomas, nor my heirs, nor any one in our behalf, can from henceforth demand or lay claim to any right or claim in the aforesaid lands or tenements for ever. In testimony whereof I have set my seal to the present writing. These being witnesses—John le Gentyle, William of Oxcliffe, Laurence son of Thomas, Robert son of Oliver, William son of Laurence, Philip White, Lambert Despencer, and others. Dated at Lancaster the Sunday next after the feast of St. Michael, in the twentieth year of the reign of King Edward. (1292.)


In 1277 Roger son of John the Dispenser and Alice his wife held a piece of land claimed by Thomas son of Maud de Lancaster and Roger son of Alice de Lancaster; ibid. 21, m. 45. Aymery the Dispenser was plaintiff in 1306; ibid. 160, m. 95 d. (British History Online)


4. Master William de Lancaster, cleric


Could the following all really refer to one man? Rev. Ragg in his 1910 "de Lancaster" paper claimed that one of these was the son of a Thomas Lancaster of Strickland Ketel, and brother of a Roger de Lancaster - a family in the Kendal region. He mentions a date of 1302 as a reference for the existence of the two brothers, and 1255 in Strickland Ketel concerning the father and his probable brothers Gilbert de Lancaster and Ralf de Schypton or Shyreburn. Concerning the 1255 reference, the reference is discussed on my webpage concerning the Barons of Kendal where the theory that this Thomas was a possible son of Jordan de Lancaster is discussed. (I am not confident whether the Strickland involved was really Strickland Ketel. The Records of Kendal has this record under Strickland Roger.) I think we can confirm that one master William in the Kendal area was a son of Thomas. See Curwen and Farrer. His brother was named Roger (another son of a Thomas) in the period of 1310-1320.


On the other hand, as will be seen, so far we know of one very clearly confirmed William de Lancaster involved with the church, and he was the son of Roger de Lancaster of Rydal. However this was much earlier (1264) and in unusual circumstances. See http://books.google.com/books?lr=&id=lMIKAAAAYAAJ&pg=253, when he intervened to install a new archdeacon in Beetham, after the death of the previous one, and the Archdeadon of Richmond wrote to Henry III to complain. Comparing to the mentions of a "Master William" below, this one was close to Kendal.


Near Kendal


Around 1290, a William de Lancaster was rector of Grasmere. See http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compid=49340&strquery=grasmere


http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=49285

This Master William is in Dillicar, near Kendal...

1310 Master William de Lancastre holds of William de Ros the hamlet of Dylaker for 18d. of cornage and 3s. 6d. of puture; Cal. Inq., v, 119.


Near Lancaster


http://books.google.com/books?id=gZ41AAAAMAAJ&pg=PA27

To their original site the friars [the Blackfriars of Lancaster] added about За. of land, partly assigned to them by two ecclesiastics, within the course of a century.4 By writ of May 10th, 1311, an inquisition was taken at Lancaster, July 13th, and it was returned that master William de Lancaster, might assign to the friars for enlarging their bounds, 1r. of land, which was held of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, immediately, by service of the moiety of a peppercorn a-year, and valued at 2d. a-year, and was held of the crown by the earl : so the royal licence for the transfer was granted, Aug. 22nd, the celebration of a hundred masses for the king being enjoined.


Calendar of Patent Rolls for 1299.

Nov. 22. Bishop's Barton, Licence, for a fine made by the prior before the treasurer and barons of the Exchequer, for the alienation in mortmain to the prior and convent of Lancaster of the following lands :
By Thomas, earl of Lancaster, Albert de Croxton, Adam de Burgo of Gersinghara, and Alice daughter of Simon le Orfevre of Lancaster, of a messuage each in Lancaster.
By Thomas de Hesham of three messuages and 12 acres of land in Little Hesham. 1299. Membrane 33 — cunt. By Thomas Warde of Hesham
By Thomas Warde of Hesham of a messuage and 7 acres of land there.
By Roger son of Walter of 1 acre of land there.
By Nicholas son of John of a messuage and 7 acres of land in Pulton in Amundernes.
By Master William de Lancaster of a messuage and 7 acres of land there.
By John son of James de Pulton of a messuage there. By K.

Also see the inquest made about this large transactions before it was permitted.



Near Croston.


http://books.google.com/books?id=9xQHAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA236

15 Kal. June, 1299, Master William de Lancaster was presented to the church of Eccleston, by the prior and convent of LANCASTER


There is a snippet available on Google Books which says that master William was the nephew of the Bishop of Lichfield. Try:

http://books.google.com/books?lr=&q=croston+%22de+%28lancaster+OR+lancastre+OR+loncaster+OR+loncastre+OR+lancastria+OR+lancastr%27%29%22&btnG=Search+Books

This would be interesting given the following...


http://books.google.com/books?id=aZKTSv580u8C&pg=PA502

Master William de Lancaster, parson of the church of Croston, was summoned to answer to the Prior of the church of the Blessed Mary of Lancaster of a plea that he render to him twenty pounds which are in arrear to him of an annual rent of six marks which he owes to him, etc. And wherefore the same Prior, by William de Bolton his attorney, says that he himself was seised by the hands of the said Master William, and all his predecessors Priors of the church aforesaid, from a time for which memory runneth not, were seised by the hands of the parsons of the aforesaid church of Croston, until now f1ve years elapsed before the day of obtaining the aforesaid writ, that is to say, before the fourth day of November, in the eleventh year of the reign of the Lord the King who now is, that the aforesaid Master William withdrew from him the aforesaid annual rent and refused, and as yet refuses, to render it, wherefore he says that he is deteriorated and has damage to the value of twenty pounds, etc. And therefore he produces suit, etc. And Master William, by Robert of Borwick his attorney, comes and defends the force and the injury when, etc. And he says that whereas the aforesaid Prior demands the aforesaid annual rent of his seisin by the hands of the said William, and of the seisin of the predecessors of the aforesaid Prior by the hands of all the parsons of the aforesaid church from a time for which memory runneth not, supposing that the aforesaid annual rent comes from the aforesaid church which is merely spiritual, and no special deed of the patron of the same church nor of the diocesan of the same place, without any parson being imparsoned of the same church, etc., he asks judgment whether in that Court he ought to answer. And the Prior says that he is patron of the church aforesaid, and that a certain Geoffrey, [Geoffrey de Muschamp, 1198 to 1208] late Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, Ordinary of the same place, regarding the humility of the monks of St. Martin of Sees, and the poverty of the house of St. Mary of Lancaster, granted, and by his charter confirmed, according to the tenor of the charter of a certain H. [Hugh de Novant or Minant, 1185 to 1198], his predecessor, six marks annually to be taken from his church of Croston by the hands of that clerk whom the same monks, to whom the presentation of that church is known of right to pertain, to him and his successors for the time shall present. So that they shall take three marks on the Feast of St. Michael and three marks at Easter by the hands of that clerk, etc. And he proffers a certain charter under the name of the aforesaid Geoffrey, the Ordinary, etc., which testifies this same, etc. He also says that he himself was seised of the aforesaid annual rent by the hands of the aforesaid William, etc. Wherefore he says that it is clear enough to the Court from the reasons aforesaid that the aforesaid church is lawfully charged with the aforesaid annual rent, etc. And William cannot gainsay but that the aforesaid Prior was seised of the aforesaid annual rent by the hands of the said William, and likewise the predecessors of the said Prior were seised by the hands of the parsons of the aforesaid church, as is aforesaid, nor also but that the arrears aforesaid are in arrear to the aforesaid Prior, as the same Prior above has narrated. Therefore it is considered that the aforesaid Prior should recover against him the aforesaid annual rent and the arrears aforesaid, before the day of obtaining the writ aforesaid, and forty shillings for Easter term elapsed after the date of the same writ, and his damages which are taxed at sixty shillings. And William is in mercy, etc. Damages sixty shillings taxed to the clerks, and also forty shillings of arrears after the date of the aforesaid writ. And so to the clerks in all hundred shillings.


http://books.google.com/books?id=EfgMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA561

Prior to 1317 it was intimated to the Bishop of Coventry on making his visitation in the deanery of Leyland in 1317 that William of Lancaster, rector of the Church of Croston, claimed that the Church of Eccleston pertained to the right and property of his Church of Croston, and depended on the same as a chapel upon the mother church, and often molested Master Ralph de Tunstall, rector of the Church of Eccleston, concerning the right which he had in the same. The bishop therefore summoned William of Lancaster before him to answer concerning the matter, and he appeared by Sir William of Kendal his proctor, and Master Ralph de Tunstall appeared in person. The rector of Eccleston pleaded that the Church of Eccleston is the parish church, and not dependent upon any other, and that he was admitted to the Church of Eccleston and instituted as rector, and had held it peacefully for some time, and that Master William, rector of Croston, molested him concerning his rights. In support of his contention the rector of Eccleston produced various instruments of the Priory of Lancaster to which the right of patronage of the Church of Eccleston was known to pertain. The Bishop decided that the claim of Master Ralph, rector of Eccleston, was well founded, and that the Church of Eccleston was in no way dependent upon the Church of Croston, and prohibited the rector of Croston from disturbing or interfering with the rector of Eccleston. In 1318 Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, and Leicester, Seneschal of England, granted to the Prior of our Lady of Lancaster and the monks there serving God that they might enclose sixty acres of the Waste adjoining to their close of the Ridge in the vill of Newton, within the forest of Lancaster.


http://books.google.com/books?id=EfgMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA563

In the same year (1318), Master William de Lancaster, parson of the Church of Croston, was summoned to answer to the Prior of Lancaster why he should not render to the Prior twenty pounds which was in arrear to him of an annual rent of six marks which he owed him. The Prior alleged that he and his predecessors had always received the rent from the parsons of Croston until five years past, when William ceased and refused to pay. The Prior also claimed to be patron of the Church of Croston and that Geoffrey de Muschamp, Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, regarding the humility of the monks of St. Martin and the poverty of the house of St. Mary of Lancaster, granted and confirmed six marks annually from his Church of Croston. William was obliged to admit that the Prior was seised of the rent by his hands.





Thomas son of Roger (Roger Conne?); ancestors of the Lawrences of Ashton


This is probably the ancestor of the Lawrences of Ashton. It is often suggested, and has been suggested by me in the past, that Roger is Roger de Lancaster of Rydal, sometime sheriff of Lancaster, amongst other important positions he held. However Paul Lawrence noticed long ago that he seems a little early. I now notice that in a 1247 charter, he father already seems dead, while we know for sure that Roger of Rydal was only dead around 1290.

http://books.google.com/books?id=2fcMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA826

Grant in fee farm by brother William abbot of Furness and the convent of that place to Thomas son of Roger de Lancaster of the toft in Lancaster with the houses and kiln standing thereon which Roger, father of the said Thomas had from Adam the tanner and after his decease and the decease of Alice his wife bequeathed to the said abbot in frankalmoign, to hold by paying yearly 2s. 6d. at Pentecost and the same at St. Martin for all service. Witnesses, [see below]. Given at Furness in A.D. 1247.


He was contemparary with, firstly in the above charter...

Sir William de Furness,

Richard de Copeland (?),

Matthew de Hodman then sheriff of Lancaster,

Roger Gernet,

Thomas de Capernwray,

Adam de Kellet


http://books.google.com/books?id=d_AMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA314

Orm, son of Harold of Lancaster, (granted land)

Gylemin Francis, formerly a servant of the lord the Prior of Lancaster, (received "an acre of land in the territory of Lancaster, that, namely, which Orm bought of Adam his brother.)

Laurence fitz William, then Seneschal of the lord the Prior of Lancaster;

Roger son of Fulk, then reeve of Lancaster;

Thomas son of Roger Conne, then reeve of Lancaster;

Pain Nimca,(?) (Could be the father with Robert son of Pain, who appears later?)

Walter Ruffus,

William the clerk,

William son of John,

Robert son of Hugh,


http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=53258#n145 says...

Lanc. Ch. ii, 313; a grant of land by Orm son of Harold. The reeves were Roger son of Fulk and Thomas son of Roger Conne. These were probably the same as the later bailiffs....


http://books.google.com/books?id=d_AMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA320

Adam, son of Harold of Lancaster, and Agnes his wife, (granted land)
Roger the chaplain, son of Cassandra of Lancaster, (received one half acre of land in the territory of Lancaster, lying, namely, in the culture which is called the Millfield)
Gerard the chaplain (his land in Millfield was on one side, and the high way which leads to Gargorham (?) was on the other)
Thomas of Capernwray,

Roger of Heaton,

John of Oxcliffe,

Gervase of Oxcliffe, clerk,

Thomas son of Roger, then reeve of Lancaster,

William son of John, then reeve of Lancaster,

John le Paneter,

William Ortolanus,


http://books.google.com/books?id=d_AMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA322

William, son of Roger de Croftes (granted land: being three perches in breadth, and eighteen perches in length, one extremity of which extends towards the way which leads to Pennystone and the other extremity towards the Deep Carr.)

William son of Laurence, who held neighbouring land

Roger son of Vivian, who also held neighbouring land

Thomas of Capernwray,

Adam of Kellet,

Gervase of Oxcliffe,

John of Oxcliffe,

Roger, chaplain of Lancaster,

Thomas son of Roger,

William son of Laurence,

William the clerk


http://books.google.com/books?id=d_AMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA324

William, son of Roger of Lancaster , (granted land: three perches of land lying on Carrfurlong and an acre of land with the meadow adjacent, abutting on the marsh of the castle)

Thomas son of Roger, (one of the neighbours of the land on Carrfurlong)

Gilemayn of the priory, (one of the neighbours of the land on Carrfurlong)

John Abby (neighbour of the acre, with "Mabbes Wallesiche " on the other side)

Thomas of Capernwray,

Adam of Kellet,

Roger of Heaton,

Gervase of Oxcliffe,

John of Oxcliffe,

Roger the chaplain,

Philip, rector of the church of Croston,

Hugh Swan,

William the clerk


http://books.google.com/books?id=d_AMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA332

Henry of Nottingham, (granted land)
Robert of Kelgrimsargh (received) and his heirs,

Roger, son of Roger Carpenter, is held for a burgage of Henry in Lancaster

Roger of Beaton,

Gervase of Bolton,

John of Oxcliffe,

Thomas son of Roger,

William son of John,

Nicholas of Thornton,


http://books.google.com/books?id=d_AMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA346

Dionisia, formerly the wife of John, son of the Forester, made a grant of a moiety of a toft in Scotforth, and a perch of land next the said moiety of the toft, with the commons and easements to the vill of Scotforth pertaining.

Roger Forester and Mabel his wife appear to be her deceased husband's parents, who had the land being granted.

John the Turner formerly held the neighbouring land under the same church being granted, with the other extremity neighbouring the high way, and the other to the land which formerly held of the Dated on the Thursday next after the feast of St. Barnabas the Apostle, at Lancaster, in the year of the grace of the Lord 1256.

Thomas son of Roger,

William son of John,

John Claviger,

Hugh Swan,

Robert son of Pain,

Walter son of Christiana,

Thomas Barefoot


http://books.google.com/books?id=d_AMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA390

William de Rey, Prior of Lancaster, (grantor)

Robert, son of Alexander, formerly rector of the church of Poulton, with a sister Edusa who would be heir if Robert has no heir

Thomas son of Roger of Lancaster,

Roger the chaplain of the same,

Thomas the chaplain of the same,

Nicholas, then Seneschal of the Prior of Lancaster,

Aylmer of Lecamton


http://books.google.com/books?id=yf8qAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA172

94. S.D. [1236-1262.] Grant in frankalmóign, from Adam, son of Harald de Lancaster, to the abbot and monks of St. Mary of Furness, of all his land in Milnefeld, described by bounds. Witnesses: Thomas de Coupmanewra, Hugh de Mitton, William, son of Ingrith, Adam de Kelet, Roger de Heaton, Elias de Thornbrantheved, Adam, son of Gilbert, Roger, son of Fulco, and Thomas, son of Roger. (Seal.) See Annal. Fumes., Ixxviii.



Thomas, the ancestor of the Laurences of Ashton, had a son and heir named Laurence. So it is striking that a Laurence son of Thomas appears in later charters, with a very over-lapping group of characters by his side, but never with Thomas himself.

http://books.google.com/books?id=d_AMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA315

Helewise, daughter of John, son of Gilbert of Lancaster, gives
William, son of Roger, all the whole right and claim
William, son of John, formerly held.

William son of Julian of Lancaster,

Master Thomas of Kirkham,

John of Oxcliffe,

Gervase of Oxcliffe,

Laurence son of Thomas,

Lambert son of John

http://books.google.com/books?id=d_AMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA326

Thomas, son of Robert, son of Mawe of Lancaster, and grandson of William son of Roger,

John le Gentyle,

William of Oxcliffe,

Laurence son of Thomas,

Robert son of Oliver,

William son of Laurence,

Philip White,

Lambert Despencer,

Dated at Lancaster the Sunday next after the feast of St. Michael, in the twentieth year of the reign of King Edward. (1292.)

http://books.google.com/books?id=d_AMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA327

Garner son of William de Lancaster

John of Oxcliffe,

John le Gentyle,

William of Oxcliffe,

William son of Julian,

Laurence son of Thomas,

William son of Laurence,

Lambert Despenser,

Robert Oliver

http://books.google.com/books?id=d_AMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA304

Thomas Travers,
John de Insula and John de Doncastre, Justices of our lord the King assigned to take Assises at Lancaster, on the morrow of Holy Trinity, in the 2 Ed II.

Sir Henry of Keighley(?),

John Gentil,

Nicholas de Marisco,

Richard le Botiler,

Laurence son of Thomas of Lancaster,

William of Slyne,

Alan of Ashton,

Dated at Lancaster on the Sunday next after the feast of Holy Trinity, in the year of the King abovesaid. (1309)

http://books.google.com/books?id=d_AMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA275

William le Gentyl

Edmund de Norvill, Sheriff of Lancaster,

Ranulph le Gentyl,

William of Slyne,

Laurence son of Thomas,

John of Lancaster, and others.

Dated at Lancaster on the Sunday next after the feast of the Apostles Philip and James, in the ninth year of the reign of King Edward, the son of King Edward (1316).

http://books.google.com/books?id=d_AMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA330

Robert, son of Iva de Lancaster

John le Gentyle,

William son of Julian,

Laurence son of Thomas,

Lambert Despencer, then bailiff of Lancaster,

William son of Laurence,

Robert son of Pain,

Adam of Northbreck, clerk

http://books.google.com/books?id=d_AMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA331

Gilbert Vivian of Lancaster

John le Gentil,

William son of Julian,

Laurence son of Thomas,

Lambert Despencer,

Robert Oliver,

Robert Payn,

Robert de Catherton

http://books.google.com/books?id=yf8qAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA163

18. A.D. 1285. Grant from Robert, son of Adam de Ros, to the abbey and monks of Furness, of a burgage at le Stanes, in the vill of Lancaster, site and particulars described. Witnesses : John le Gentil, William, the son of Julius, Robert Fitz-Payn, Robert Oliver, Robert de Cathcrton, Robert de Bolrun, Roger Beddyng, William, son of Lawrence, Lawrence, son of Thomas, and Lambert Despenser. Lancaster, 2 October. (Seal.) See Annal. Furnes., Ixxviii.


The frequent appearance of the Gentil family reminds us of some of the earliest clear records of the Lawrence family:

http://books.google.com/books?id=U1MJAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA175

20 EDWARD I. (1292). 1/5

No. 57.—At Lancaster, on the Octave of Holy Trinity,
20 Edward I. [8th June, 1292].
Between Laurence, son of Thomas of Lancaster, plaintiff, and Nicholas Gentil, tenant, by William Gentil, his brother, put in his place, of two messuages and thirty acres of land in Skereton. Nicholas acknowledged the tenement to be the right of Laurence, and rendered it to him, and quit-claimed it to him and his heirs in perpetuity. For this release Laurence gave him one hundred shillings sterling.

http://books.google.com/books?id=_QQrAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA102

Calendar of Patent Bolls: 8 Edward I. (1279/80)

m. I7d. (18). Lancaster (Lane.) ; appointment of Geoffrey Aguillon and Alan de Walkingham to take the assise of mort dancestor arraigned by Laurence son of Thomas de Lancaster against William de Gather- ton and others, touching possessions in.