The Livingston/Maclea/Boggs DNA surname project accepts participants with any of the following names in the paternal ancestry:-

 

  1. Livingston

Basic Variants:

Livingston

 

Liveston

 

Liviston

Livingstoun

 

Livestoun

 

Livistoun

Livingstone

 

Livestone

 

Livistone

Livingstoune

 

Livestoune

 

Livistoune

 

 

 

 

 

Levingston

 

Leviston

 

 

Levingstoun

 

Levistoun

 

 

Levingstone

 

Levistone

 

 

Levingstoune

 

Levistoune

 

 

 

 

A special variant from Angus-shire and Perth-shire:

Livage

 

Liveage

 

Livadge

 

Livige

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levage

 

Levadge

 

Levidge

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leavage

 

Leavadge

 

Leavadge

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leivage

 

Leivadge

 

Leivadge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lovage

 

Loveage

 

Lovadge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Livitch

 

Livetch

 

Livietch

 

Liviech

 

Livich

 

Livish

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lavitch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A presumed variant from Caithness:

Levack

Levach

 

  1. MacLea (said to come from Mac Dhuinsleibhe, meaning “son of Dunleavy”)

 

    1. In the oldest records, the D, N, S, and BH, appeared inconsistently in the spelling because not fully pronounced in the Gaelic.

 

(i)                  The S would normally be dropped in pronunciation, as in the English version of the name, Dunleavy. But those knowing Gaelic probably included it sometimes.

McDunslaue is observed in 1518 as a personal name and patronymic amongst bond givers for the “clan Dowleavis” in Argyll

McDonnslae is observed in 1623

VcDunlaif is observed in North Argyll in 1570

 

(ii)                The D would have been dropped especially in cases where the MAC (son of) and the Dunleavy, had joined together in the mind of the writer (who might not be the speaker) as one word. The obvious extension of this was a doubling of the C in MAC. In such cases, the S would be expected to be long gone.

McConleif is observed in 1498 in Kilrawok

 

(iii)               The N would drop if the S was dropped, as it would in most languages if it were between a vowel and a liquid.

McColeif is observed in 1504 in Strathconon

Makcolluf and McCulloif appear in Appin in 1509

Clan Dowleavis appears in 1518 in Argyll

 

(iv)              The BH, if it appeared in Latin, French or English documents would normally be as a V, F or W and could also be easily dropped or ignored.

McDunlewe is observed in 1541 in Killespic-Kerrill and Kilmarnock

McCollea is observed in Dunollie in 1588

 

    1. In the 17th century the name mainly appears with all of the above elements missing as McOnlea or McOnlay, which becomes McLae or McLea etc in the 18th century which is also the time when many MacLeas began to use the Livingstone surname. However regional variants persisted and were in some cases perhaps re-interpreted, because the MacLeas were already spread widely. Any confusion was of course only increased by the mass movement of Scotts into Ireland and America.

McOnlea, McOnlay,

                  In Mull:             McOnlew, McDunslea

In Banffshire:    Mc O Lea, Mc O Lei

                                    In Inveraven:     McCollae, McAllea, McKlea, McAlea, McKoilea, McKollie, McLea, McOlea

SW Scotland:   McClew, MacClue, MacCluie, McCloo, MacGlew

 

    1. Based upon the above, we therefore accept interested members with name variants of Dunleavy, MacAuley, Maginley, MacKinley, MacInlay, MacAnally, MacLean, MacCloy, McConnelly, McAleavy, and Connolly and many more within reason. Of course where appropriate we will work together with other Irish and Scottish DNA projects (where there is one) to try to find the true ancestry of such families with different possible origins.

 

  1. Boggs

Variants:

Bog

Bogs

Bogue

Bogues

Bogg

Boggs

Boig

Boigs

 

 

The Isle of Lismore, Home of the Chief of the Clan MacLea, looking from the pier at Port Appin

Taken 4th June 2006 by Andrew Lancaster