The Lancaster, Lancashire etc Surname DNA project.

Results Page #3: Haplogroups apart from E and R

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Welcome to one of the results webpages of our genealogical DNA project for several Northern English surnames, which are especially associated with the historic county of Lancashire, especially Lancaster group of surnames including Lanchester, Lancashire, Lankshear, Lankester, etc. Click for the homepage.

This page is about results for all the results with the Lancaster which are not in the R1b, R1a and E1b1b haplogroups. Most of the results on this third results page are in Haplogroup I.

This project is a volunteer-run genealogical project, open to all families potentially affiliated with any surnames potentially related to those mentioned. It is run by participants, for participants, and affiliated with ISOGG, and not any single commercial lab. (We are recognized by most major testing companies working with genealogists.) This webpage and most associated with it are kept up-to-date, more-or-less, by Andrew Lancaster. The project and its webpages are work in progress, and may contain errors. If you think you see something you want to copy, please contact the author (andrew.lancaster@skynet.be) to give us a chance to update you on the latest possibilities.


DNA results table for Haplogroup I Lancasters

After R1b, I haplotypes are generally the second most common in British surname projects. While we so far only have one such family in the project, it should however be said that there are many types of I haplotype, only very distantly related to each other, which should not be lumped together too hastily. Our group is particularly diverse! I have included colour coding designed to make this more visible. Each of these male lines is very distinct.

Kit N5390. William Lancaster, of Fayette Co. PA, b abt 1820-1830, in Pennsylvania.

This Lancaster family can be traced back to William Lancaster, born about 1820, who married Lydia Goe first, and Ellen Simpson second, and had children in Fayette County in South Western Pennsylvania. In the 1880 census they appear as a mulatto family, though earlier censuses say they are white. Lydia Goe was mulatto, so was William? The DNA shows that his male ancestry at least was very northern European. Mixed marriages appear to have been more frequent out closer to the frontiers.

William appears to be the son of Joseph and Sarah Lancaster, who appear as neighbours in the 1870 census. It is said by some genealogists that Sarah was Sarah Bee née Sanderlan. This Joseph, who the 1870 census says was born in Virginia, is in turn said to be the son of another Joseph. There appear to have been several other Lancasters in early Fayette county records, including a John and a Henry.

Speculation about this family has generally involved looking for individuals in the Lancaster families of Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia who might have moved inland to Fayette. But the DNA testing appears to show that if he was related to any of these it must be for example via a daughter who had a child out of wedlock. It is also remarkable that this family was clearly illiterate whereas that would be very surprising for either the Maryland Lancasters or Bucks Co Lancasters.

Kit 102605. Ezekiel Benjamin Lancaster was in Pickens County, Alabama, and appears to have been born, though it is not known where, about 1805.

Ezekiel and his wife eventually moved to Neshoba Co., Mississippi, in about 1837 and had children.

Family Tree DNA predicts that this haplotype is an I1a haplotype, and indeed it has DYS455=8 and other markers which identify it pretty strongly. However, Ken Nordvedt has not categorized this I haplotype. (See http://knordtvedt.home.bresnan.net/.) So it is apparently a relatively unusual branch of the ancient I1a “family”.

Nicholas Lancaster’s family has been traced back from Hampshire to Burton in Kendal, in the southern part of Westmorland. See his website: www.lancasterfamilytree.com.

The furthest back we know so far is William Lancaster who was a farmer, and a resident of Burton in Kendal, who married in nearby Hutton Roof to Nancy Rawbotham 5 June 1802. It is not known where he was born, but according to the 1841 census it must have been between 1761 and 1771. But where? He does not appear in the 1787 Constable’s Census of Westmorland, at least not in Southern Westmorland. Presumably he came from either Northern Westmorland, where many Lancasters historically lived near Ullswater, or else from Lancashire to the south.

Obviously this connection to Kendal makes this yet one more contender for the DNA signature of the Lancasters of Westmorland (a very old family who may perhaps have had more than one male line). See the two very different E haplotypes above to see our other two candidates, although perhaps we should consider all Lancaster families as candidates until we can prove at least one paper trail and preferably two!

More anciently, this haplotype is another branch of the I group, but very distant from our other ones. Specifically, this haplotype appears to be I1b, rather than I1a. The last common male line ancestor may be as far back as 20,000 years ago! (See http://knordtvedt.home.bresnan.net/WarpedFounderTree.jpg).

Thomas Lancaster owned 164 acres in winnebago county, Illinois. He had come to the USA with his twin brother, William in the 1840's. The family is said to have come from the area of Thirkleby in Yorkshire.

William originally purchased 160 acres in Newark township in Rock County, Wisconsin. William passed away intestate in 1847 and his father in England was declared the heir. Thomas Lancaster Sr., of Towthorpe, County of Yorkshire, England, then granted the land to William’s twin, Thomas Lancaster Jr, of Rock County, Wisconsin Territory.  In 1882 Thomas sold the 160 acres in Wisconsin and purchased 164 acres just across the Illinois Stateline in Shirland township in Winnebago.

Our participating family appears to descend from an illegitimate son Frank Austin Lancaster, who Thomas Jr & wife Sarah Hyde took in as their own. Frank Austin Lancaster married the niece of Thomas Lancaster Jr., Jane Eastwood. Her mother was Martha Lancaster (married to George Eastwood) who was a sister of Thomas Lancaster Jr.

We have another I haplotype result, from Ancestry.com. This is a member of the project via their system, but we have not yet had any contact about this family. We know nothing about them until we do!

Lancaster Kit 133939. This family has been traced back to Wath, in Yorkshire, but is it Wath Upon Dearne or Wath Juxta Ripon?

In the 19th century, this family lived in and around Hull in Yorkshire. From there it can be traced back to Wath. The family report that John Lancaster son of Thomas was baptised 6/12/1772 in Wath and moved to the Hull area. Although the family believe this was Wath upon Dearne, the baptism corresponds to one in Wath juxta Ripon – an area near to many other Lancaster families in this project, although none are a match until now (see especially 133069 in the R1b table, while looking at a map). The wife of Thomas appears to have been named Ellen, if we look at the baptisms in the register at the time.


An Unknown Haplogroup?!
Robert Lancaster and Cecily Miller of Wigan had Simon Lancaster in 1860. He had his son George in Pittsburg PA in 1888.

DYS393=14

DYS394=14

DYS458=18

DYS459=8-9

DYS455=11

DYS454=11

DYS449=30

DYS464=10.3-11.2-15-13

DYS456=15

DYS461=11

DYS441=15

DYS463=14

This truly remarkable DNA signature comes from the public database at www.smgf.org. I have found nothing like it so far. Does it perhaps indicate non-European ancestry (perhaps very far back in history)?

In any case, genealogist Jim Lancaster believes that this is one Lancaster line we can trace to its origin:

I believe that this Robert is descended from Joseph LANCASTER of Pilkington in Prestwich Parish, whose predecessors were from the Cliviger area close to Burnley and south of Colne. Robert was the son of Elizabeth LANCASTER, daughter of Joseph and a spinster. There is no father named in his baptism record in St Mary CE Church, Radcliffe (Radcliffe Parish Church). This, as I understand your notes, would explain the markedly different DNA profile. http://boards.ancestry.com/surnames.lancaster/1248.1/mb.ashx.

In other words, this family seems to be related to our E1b1b family discussed in on results page 1, but via a daughter, which is why they have a different male line genetic signature.


A Lancaster in the O2a haplogroup

 

 

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Lancaster

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This result was tested via http://dna.ancestry.com. The project does not yet have any genealogical information but Ancestry predict the haplogroup to be O2a, which is associated with East Asia.


A Lancaster in the G2a haplogroup

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Lancaster Kit 142164. The G haplogroup is not one of the more common British haplogroups, although it is found there, and all over Europe. It is more common in Southern Europe, especially South-Eastern Europe, and the Middle East, and most common of all in the Caucausus.

In this case we predicted the haplogroup using Whit Athey’s online predictor at http://www.hprg.com/hapest5/hapest5b/hapest5.htm



1. The header of this webpage uses the Red Rose graphic symbolizing Lancaster and Lancashire which can be found on English Wikipedia. Click on the Rose to go there.