Religious Objects


Very few traces remain of ancient Jewish art in Morocco, because, as in all other Islamic world countries, the ancient object was not appealing to people at the time.

In Morocco, trades were transmitted from father to sons in the same families (wherefrom the frequent custom of names representative of the familial trade).

Such was the tradition that used objects were recycled, as much as possible. For instance, the metal of an old object was often molten in order to create a new one, most of the time similar in style as the previous. It is the case with Hispanic-Moor style objects, markedly used for Hanukkah lamps. This is the reason why it is easy to recognize styles and symbols of past centuries on more recent objects.


tappuhim.jpg (33680 bytes)

Tappuhim (ornaments for the Torah scrolls). 19th, Meknès. Chiseled silver, gold and enamel.   Haut de la page...

yad.jpg (13156 bytes)

Yad (indicated hand used to follow the text when reading the Torah scroll). 19th. Chiseled silver.   Haut de la page...

mehil_thora.jpg (83638 bytes)

Mehil Torah (coat protecting the Torah scrolls). 1933, Fès. Velvet embroidered with metallic gold threads, inscription on the top registry to the name of Aïcha Azuelos.   Haut de la page...

kos.jpg (33296 bytes)

Kos (commemorative lamp for the synagogue). Beginning 20th, Casablanca. Chiseled silver and glass decorated with golden motives.   Haut de la page...

parokhet.jpg (47358 bytes)

Parokhet (curtain for the ark). 1916, Fès. Velvet and metallic gold threads, embroidered frame and angle flowers, center inscription to the name of Yaakov Meloul Ben Avraham.   Haut de la page...

Page last updated: 26 Sep 1999 WebSite created by: Medius Lynx.